Camera Neck Strap Extension Cord for the Mad Max Camera Wrist Strap

Yes, an extension that converts your wrist strap into a camera neck strap, but first I want to go back to the original article about the wrist strap.
The blog about the camera wrist strap was not received with the enthusiasm I expected, but that can happen.
Then, some time later, I read an article at https://casualphotophile.com/ about Wrist straps: Wrist Assured – The 21 Best Wrist Straps for 2021.
A very detailed and well written article, it was clear that James Tocchio, the owner of the site, had done his research well.
But why not a homemade option? so I asked James if I could link to my own design in the commentaries, and James was kind enough to allow that.
After this link, the enthusiasm had not improved, and that was because there was a problem.


From the responses I learned that there where three reasons for this.
First, the concept without buckles was not completely clear, only cord that didn’t seem possible, did it?
Second, it wouldn’t be strong enough either, two thin strings of 4mm, we don’t want to hang an expensive camera on it, do we?
And third : we don’t want a strap made of cheap Chinese cord, we prefer to buy genuine American handcrafted straps

1) The concept is indeed paracord only, you can add a decoration as in the example here, but the wrist strap itself consists only of paracord. In the photos below you can see how the wrist strap is attached to the camera.

In the picture below and under the camera you can see the wrist strap in its simplest form.
A central part (loop) that is knotted at the end.
Around that central portion or loop there is a woven piece – called the cobra stitch.
The woven part can be moved left or right over the central part, it has a certain friction on it that ensures that everything stays in place when it is around your arm.

Now the attachment on the camera in five steps :

Thats it !

You can add decoration if you want, but they have no function.

The extra red piece paracord above helps keeping the knot on the camera tighten, but is not necessary and is also more a piece of decoration.

2) The strength?
Paracord type III is 4mm thick and is indicated with the number 550, which is also the breaking strength of the rope, namely 550 pounds or 250kg.
Well, I don’t know what type of camera you are using, but 250kg on one wire should be enough, right?
Unless you own the camera below, then indeed the wrist strap will not do, but it will be more of a problem for your back I think.

By George Raymond Lawrence – Historic photo via http://www.fotoart.gr/istoria/onephotoonestory/giantcamera.htm, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7654197

3) If you make this bracelet yourself, it is certainly handcrafted – and in your own country.
And the rope? Paracord is made all over the world, it used to be part of a parachute, nowadays it is used for all kinds of purposes such as adventure and survival. The rope I used in this example is from the brand “Marbles” it is made in the US.

I think I tackled all the worries and questions, if not send me a new one below.

What I would like to add myself is that this design is not just a wrist strap, but a tool.
You can use it to keep your keys together, to attach something, I use them at camp to close up garbage bags and hang them in a tree, attach pouches to your belt. They can be easily taken apart to recover the rope, and new possibilities open up. You always have a piece of string with you. Fun to make with your children – grandchildren, and cheap. My older children and my grandchildren, wife, all use it and have at least one.

And then finally, converting the wrist strap in to a camera strap with the extension cord.
The wrist strap remains on the camera and can still be used if you wish.
The extension cord actually looks almost the same as the bracelet when not fitted, in this case a long central part (loop) with two woven parts on top. The largest woven part is just support for your neck, that’s all. The shorter part holds the rope around the bracelet so that it cannot pass through. This just happens due to friction, even if you were hanging 100kg on the camera strap it wouldn’t open.
Instead of two woven sections you could make this one piece if you prefer, just leave enough room for two loops on each side that are big enough to thread the bracelet through.

Everything will become clear with the pictures below:

The total length of the extension cord (loop), just behind the knot is 125cm.
So, the total length of the cord needed for the central section is around 2.6m – 2.7m
For the neck part you need a piece of 2.5m, which gives a woven piece of about 20cm
And then another shorter piece for attaching to the wrist band, about 1.25m – longer is better.

The original article here and the manual on my bushcraft website:

https://marcrphoto.wordpress.com/2020/11/16/my-mad-max-camera-wrist-strap-a-fun-diy-during-lockdown/

https://thebushcraftfamily.wordpress.com/workshop-mad-max-parakoord-armband/

Published by Marc R.

Belgium Based and Retired Photographer, IT specialist, Technician and Bushcrafter - not necessarily in that order. A few years back I got a message on my PC : "The box said 'Required Windows 11 or better'. So, I installed Linux Kubuntu 20.04 LTS" :-) - My Photography software : RawTherapee, Darktable, Digikam, Luminance HDR, Hugin, Gimp and many other. Oh yes, the email address is still there, but I'm not a Pentaxian anymore - now i'am proud to be a Fujiian !

2 thoughts on “Camera Neck Strap Extension Cord for the Mad Max Camera Wrist Strap

  1. I love this idea. I used a wrist strap for a long time, but with the X-T3, I’ve found its just a little too heavy to carry all day, so now use a Cordy next strap of similar materials. I chose a 60 inch one, so it hangs down by my hip, I dislike cameras hanging on my chest or belly.

    Liked by 1 person

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